Motivation Level

Proactive: You are an initiator. You have a tendency to act with little or no consideration and jump into situations without thinking and analysing. This may upset some people as they perceive you are bulldozing ahead with what you want to do. You are good at going out and getting the job done and you do not wait for others to initiate. 

Mainly Proactive: You are likely to be motivated by getting on with a task and taking the lead. You do balance action with consideration and would take the time to analyse, understand and think. You prefer to go out and get the job done rather than waiting for others to initiate. 

Equally Proactive and Reactive: You initiate or wait for others to initiate and can do so with equal ease. You can be energised, while at the same time think and not act. Understanding is just as important as action. You need your work to provide the opportunity to do both. 

Mainly Reactive: You are more likely to think and consider before jumping into action and are mostly motivated by situations where you get to understand, analyse and think. You may wait for others to initiate and feel more comfortable responding. 

Reactive: You will wait for others to initiate or wait until the situation is right before you act. You are more likely to analyse and consider without acting and spend a lot of your time waiting. You tend to operate with extreme caution and study situations endlessly. 

Motivation Direction

Toward: You think in terms of goals to be achieved and are motivated to have, get, achieve and attain them. Because your concentration on goals is so accomplished, you are good at managing priorities. Because of this, you often have trouble recognising what should be avoided and may be perceived as naive by others as you do not take potential obstacles into account.

Mainly Toward: Your motivation is usually triggered to “move towards” achieving and attaining your goals. You are good at prioritising your workload in order to get there. Whilst you may be aware of situations that need to be avoided, got rid of, or not have happen, you may not take potential obstacles into account. 

Equally Toward And Away From: Your motivation is equally triggered to “move towards” achieving and attaining goals and avoiding and preventing bad situations happening. This enables you to balance goals with the “what ifs” to achieve a positive outcome. 

Mainly Away From: Your motivation is usually triggered to move away from bad situations. You are primarily energised when there is a problem to be solved, a situation to be avoided, got rid of, or not have happen. You are a natural trouble shooter. You do like to achieve things, however may get distracted from a goal when problem solving.

Away From: You notice what should be avoided and got rid of. Your motivation is triggered when there is a problem to be solved or when there is a situation to move away from. You are energised by threats and are a natural trouble shooter. 

Motivation Source

Internal: You like to decide for yourself because your motivation comes from inside of you. You decide about the quality of your work. You may have difficulty accepting other people’s opinions and outside direction because of this. Your motivation is triggered when you get to gather information from the outside, process it against your own standards and make judgements about it.

Mainly Internal: You usually decide for yourself and are motivated when you get to decide. To a lesser extent you need feedback from others to check how well you are doing as you generally know within yourself. You will take this feedback and evaluate it by your own standards. In your ideal work situation, you would have the opportunity to judge your work for yourself using feedback from others as input.

Equally Internal and External: At times you are motivated to decide for yourself and at other times you don’t have a particular need to be the one who decides. To a certain extent you need feedback from others to check how well you are doing. However you might take this feedback and evaluate it by your own standards depending on the situation. In your ideal work situation, you would have the opportunity to judge your work for yourself and get feedback from others.

Mainly External: In situations where you have to decide for yourself, you can and will, but you don’t have a particular need to be the one who decides. Your motivation is triggered when you get feedback, either from other people or from results. In the absence of such feedback you will become demotivated. You may accept information as instructions.

External: You need other people’s opinions, outside direction and feedback from external sources to stay motivated. If you do not get feedback or results of some kind at work, you won’t know how well you are doing. You gather information from the outside and they become your standards.

Motivation Reason

Procedures: You like to follow set ways and believe there is a “right way” to do things. Once you have a procedure you can follow it over and over again. You are primarily interested in how to do things, not why things are the way they are. Without a starting point you may feel lost or stuck. When you start something, you are compelled to finish it.

Mainly Procedures: You are usually motivated to follow a set process and believe there is a “right” way to do things. You are open to finding other ways of doing things as long as you achieve the desired result. It is important to you to complete tasks otherwise you may feel demotivated.

Equally Procedures and Options: You are equally motivated to develop new options and find other ways of doing things as you are to follow an existing process or procedure. This balance enables you to find new ways of doing things whilst finishing what you have started.

Mainly Options: You are usually motivated to develop new options and find other ways of doing things. You are interested in “why” things work the way they do. You understand the importance of processes and procedures, yet may have difficulty in following them over and over again. When asked to simply follow a procedure you may try to fix the procedure or find new ways of doing things.

Options: You are motivated to develop new options and possibilities to do something in a different way. You are interested in “why” things work the way they do and love to create procedures and systems but have great difficulty following them. You like to start a new idea or project but are not compelled to finish it.

Motivation Decision Factors

Sameness: You do not like change at work and want things to stay the same. If exposed to change you may refuse to adapt. You may accept major change once every ten years, however given the choice you will provoke change every fifteen to twenty five years.

Sameness With Exception: You like your work situation to progress and evolve over a period of time and will accept change once a year if the change is not too drastic. On average, you like to do the same work for about five to seven years before needing major change.

Difference: You love change! You thrive on constant, major change often and resist static or stable situations. You need drastic change every one to two years and if you do not get this your motivation will drop. You like change to be revolutionary and different.

Sameness With Difference And Exception: You like your work situation to change with revolutionary shifts, and are also comfortable when things are evolving. When you are sure that you know your job, you are happy doing that job for a couple of years. For some aspects of your work you like to do a job for five to seven years. On average you seek change every three years.

Working Scope

Specific: You handle small pieces of information well, yet if you are extremely detailed, you cannot perceive or create an overview. You treat information in linear sequences, step by step, in all its detail. This enables you to manage sequences of events well.

Mainly Specific: You prefer to have a detailed understanding of tasks and can work with specific details for extended periods of time. You are able to manage sequences of events well. Whilst you can grasp the overview of what you are doing or the broader context, you may have difficulty standing back and seeing the bigger picture.

Equally Specific and General: You like to have a detailed understanding of tasks and at the same time you have the ability to see the big picture. You are able to work with specific details for extended periods of time and manage sequences of events well.

Mainly General: You usually make sense of your work as an overview and prefer to work on the big picture. You can work with specific details for extended periods of time before standing back from it.

General: General: You make sense of your work as an overview and prefer to work on the big picture. You can work with specific details for finite periods of time as dealing with details for any length of time irritates you.

Working Attention Direction

Self: You have a tendency to focus on the content of what people are saying rather than the accompanying tone, body language or level of rapport. You may find it challenging to build rapport and make sense of the communications with others because you do not notice other people’s body language and will miss clues. You know how well the communication is going based only on your own feelings.

Borderline Self: You can be sensitive to the nonverbal behaviour of others, such as voice, facial expression, body posture and so on. At times however you may focus on the content of what people are saying rather than the accompanying tone, body language or level of rapport. In those instances, you may find it challenging to build rapport and make sense of the communications with others based on the nonverbal part of the communication.

Other: You have an automatic reflex reaction to people’s behaviours and respond to their facial expressions, body posture and movements and shifts in voice tone. You can make sense of how the communication with others is going based on the nonverbal signals. You are good at building and maintaining rapport.

Work Stress Response: Feelings

Feelings: You react to work pressures by having an emotional response and can get stuck in the emotion for an inappropriate length of time. Other people may perceive you to be over sensitive or over reacting to situations.

Feelings And Some Choice: You react to work pressures by having an emotional response and can get stuck in the emotion for an inappropriate length of time. You do have the ability to adapt and take a step back which allows you to empathise with others if the situation calls for it.

Working Style: Independent

Independent: You like to work on your own with sole responsibility. Your productivity suffers if others are around or if you have to share responsibility. You might prefer to work in an office with the door closed as when interrupted you may lose your train of thought. You can go for long periods of time without craving contact with others.

Independent And Proximity: For some aspects of your work you want to be totally alone, without interruption and have sole responsibility. At other times you need well defined responsibilities and others around to bounce ideas off. To be most productive, you need to have a mix of both.

Independent And Co-operative:
At times you like to work on totally alone, without interruption with sole responsibility. At other times you like to share responsibility and do things with others. To be most productive, you need to have a mix of both

Working Style: Proximity

Proximity: You like have a clear territory of responsibility with well defined responsibilities with others around in proximity. Your productivity will suffer if you work totally alone as you need to bounce ideas off others.

Proximity And Independent: At times you like to have your own clear territory of responsibility with others around in proximity to bounce ideas off. For some aspects of your work you want sole responsibility and to be totally alone, without interruption. To be most productive, you need to have a mix of both.

Independent: Proximity and Co-operative: You like to work with other people around. At times you prefer to have a clear territory of responsibility, at other times share responsibility and work in a team. Your productivity will suffer if you have to work totally alone.

Working Style: Co-Operative

Co-operative: You like to share responsibility with others and do activities with someone else. You do not need to have a territory to be in charge of, and if managing people, will do things with your employees. You will have trouble with deadlines and finishing tasks if you have to work on your own.

Co-Operative And Proximity: You like to work with other people around. At times you prefer to have a clear territory of responsibility, at other times share responsibility and work in a team. Your productivity will suffer if you have to work totally alone.

Co-Operative And Independent: At times you like to work on totally alone, without interruption with sole responsibility. At other times you like to share responsibility and do things with others. To be most productive, you need to have a mix of both.

Working Organisation

Person: You pay attention to the feelings and thoughts of others and focus on people’s needs. Feelings take on such an importance that the become the task itself. You are good at establishing rapport.

Mainly Person: While at work, you focus mainly on people’s needs. You can also be task focused but at times you may drop these tasks to take care of someone’s personal feelings. At these times, you may need to remember the goals and decide on priorities, which you have the ability to do.

Equally Person And Thing: You are able to concentrate on the task at hand as well as focus on people’s needs. You can be responsive to others’ feelings whilst being motivated to get the job done.

Mainly Thing: You are usually motivated to concentrate on the task at hand (products, ideas, tools, systems). Whilst you will take people’s needs and feelings into consideration, you want to get things done and are primarily task orientated.

Thing: You are motivated to get the job done and prioritise in order to do so. You concentrate on the task at hand (products, ideas, tools, systems) rather than focus on people’s needs and feelings. You want to get things done and are task orientated.

Working Rule Structure

My My: You expect others to work the way you work because you believe that people are similar and what is good for you is good for others. You have no difficulty in telling others at work what you expect.

My / .: You have rules for yourself but you don’t care about others because it is not your problem or concern. You often get on with what you need to do without thinking about others.

No/My: You do not have rules or guidelines for yourself but once given the rules are quite willing to pass them on to others. Because of this you may have difficulty in providing direction for yourself or making decisions.

My/Your: You have clear expectations of yourself and your performance at work but may be reluctant to communicate them to others as you believe that everyone is different. This can be confusing to others if you need to delegate a task as they need to understand what is expected of them.

My/My and My/Your: At times you expect others to work the way you work because you believe that people are similar and what is good for you is good for others. At other times you may be reluctant to communicate your expectations to others as you believe that everyone is different. This can be confusing to others if you need to delegate a task as they need to understand what is expected of them.

Convincer Channel: See

See: You need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced.

See and Hear: You need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced.

See And Read: You need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to read something to start the process of becoming convinced.

See And Do: You need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced.

Convincer Channel: Hear

Hear: You need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced.

Hear And See: You need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent, you need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced.

Hear And Read: You need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent, you need to read something to start the process of being convinced.

Hear And Do: You need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent, you need to do something to start the process of being convinced.

Convincer Channel: Read

Read: You need to read something to start the process of being convinced.

Read And See: You need to read something to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced.

Read And Hear: You need to read something to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced.

Read And Do: You need to read something to start the process of being convinced. To a lesser extent you need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced.

Convincer Channel: Do

Do: You need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced.

Do And See: You need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent you need to visually see a product, service or idea to start the process of being convinced.

Do And Hear: You need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent you need to hear something or have an oral presentation to start the process of becoming convinced.

Do And Read: You need to do something to start the process of becoming convinced. To a lesser extent you need to read something to start the process of becoming convinced.

Convincer Mode

Number of Examples: You need to take information in through your preferred sensory channel a certain number of times before you are convinced. Less than this amount of time leaves you unconvinced.

Automatic: You only need a small amount of information taken in through your preferred sensory channel before you are convinced. You decide immediately on what you imagine the rest of the information to be. You will often give the benefit of the doubt and not easily change your mind once you’ve decided.

Consistent: You need to re-evaluate every time you encounter something through your preferred sensory channel. You are never completely convinced.

Period Of Time: You need to take information in through your preferred sensory channel over a period of time before you are convinced.